City of Vincent – Candidate survey

We reached out to candidates for the City of Vincent local government elections and got responses from the following:

Alex Castle

Alex Castle

Q1. What do you see as the main challenges to managing and reducing waste in the City of Vincent and what specific actions will you take to improve the City’s waste management outcomes:

  • in council operations?
  • in commercial operations?
  • at the residential level?

Reducing waste is such a big challenge for everyone, and on a national and global level, I think we need to be focusing more on the reduction of packaging, particularly in food production. At Council level, I'm excited that we are rolling out the FOGO three-bin system in October, and I think our community is really ready for it. The response has been very positive which is great to see as I think the Vincent community is keen to do their bit for reducing waste. We have set a target of zero waste to landfill by 2028, and removing the organic waste from the landfill bins is going to help us a long way to that target. In council operations, we're definitely trying to lead by example with bans on single-use plastics, and introducing criteria for our grant funding that applicants demonstrate sustainability measures to qualify. We've also been really happy to support projects like the TTV Community Composting Station, which has been a huge success. I was regularly sending my kitchen waste there before upgrading to my own home composting set-up! This has really helped at the residential level to make it easy for people to compost and to educate on its benefits. We still have some more projects to explore under our Waste Strategy to get us closer to that 2028 target, because there is always more to do. This year I have been appointed to the Mindarie Regional Council, which is a collection of local councils in the north of Perth who manage a shared waste facility, which is opening up more opportunities for reducing waste in a collaborative way - watch this space!

Q2. Places that are less car-dominated than the City of Vincent currently is enjoy a range of benefits including:

  • Safer streets
  • Cleaner air
  • Less traffic congestion
  • Healthier, more active population, and
  • Greater independence for children, seniors and people with disabilities.

Are you supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport (eg walking, cycling) in the City of Vincent? If so, what specific measures will you take to enable people to walk, bike (and scoot and skate) more?
If you are not supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport, tell us why.

Absolutely! Our Accessible City Strategy, which was adopted in May this year, prioritises pedestrians, cyclists and active transport users over cars and has a number of objectives aimed at encouraging active transport instead of driving. We've been a leader in the installation of bike paths and working to make the connections to the PSP, so that people have the option to cycle all over Perth. We have more work to do to make sure our footpaths are maintained so that people of all abilities can easily walk or travel around the City and this has been identified as an action in the Strategy to ensure they are upgraded regularly.

One of the reasons people love our community is that there are so many things to do within walking distance - visit the park, go to the local town centre for shopping or restaurants, walk to school. This not only helps the environment and is great for our health, but it also helps create community and we get to see our neighbours more often and interact with people on the streets on a regular basis.

As part of our Children and Young People Advisory Group, I've also been working on projects to ensure kids and teens have access to outdoor facilities and activities in their local neighbourhood, to give them opportunities to walk or ride to local places to socialise or play sport. Some examples of this include the Pop Up Play Pump Track at Britannia Reserve and the upcoming skate facility in Mount Hawthorn.

Q3. Are you supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in the City of Vincent? If so, what tangible ways will you work to increase the urban forest:

  • on public land?
  • on private land?

If you are not supportive of increasing urban greenery, tell us why.

Definitely! Vincent has consistently ensured we allocate budget funds towards our greening projects and we set ourselves ambitious targets to increase tree canopy on public land and in our town centres wherever possible. This includes actions in our Greening Plan to plant more trees than are lost or removed and preserving and enhancing biodiversity areas. Our current Council is really focused on maximising green space in the City, and have a Public Open Space Strategy that helps identify where there is a lack of park areas and a need to expand or create new open space. Built into this is the desire to have ample green space within walking distance of every residential block in Vincent, which ties in with the previous question about prioritising pedestrians and cyclists.

Private land is much more difficult for a local government to regulate and it's been devastating to see the loss of tree canopy on private land. Council has been trying to increase canopy on public land to partially compensate but there's more to be done. Our planning regulations include incentives and requirements for tree canopy and deep soil planting zones and we're often looking for ways to squeeze more trees into development applications brought to Council! We've also been lobbying the State Government to regulate for and incentivise the retention of mature trees, particularly where houses are being demolished for new builds. In addition, Council has had a number of projects to encourage greening on private land including our very popular Adopt a Verge program, our Native Plant Sales offering discounted plants for your garden, and celebrating our beautiful local gardens through the Annual Garden Competition. I'm particularly keen to see an increase in Native Plants around the City, a topic close to my heart as a result of my "day job" in Kings Park, and am currently investigating ways for us to prioritise native species for our street trees and park plantings when replacement or new plantings are happening.

Q4. What are your top priorities if elected to the City of Vincent council?

Being on Council for the last 4 years, I've realised just how much goes on in Local Government and how many projects and strategic priorities need to be balanced with capacity, budget and time! For me, what's important is continuing on our path to increased tree canopy, sustainability projects to reduce waste, better facilities for young people, like Pop Up Play and a new skate park in our area, better consultation with our community so they are included in our planning and decisions in a meaningful way, supporting a 40km/hr on local roads across Vincent and a neighbourhood approach to traffic management to ensure we address rat-running, speed and pedestrian safety and progress on underground power in Vincent.

Trent Druward

Trent Druward

Q1.
What do you see as the main challenges to managing and reducing waste in the City of Vincent and what specific actions will you take to improve the City’s waste management outcomes:

  • in council operations?

Council operations must be a leader in the reduction of waste, and this can be done by:

  • Educate and incentivise staff (prizes and pay bonuses) to bring non packed lunches and coffees to work, using only reusable containers and materials – no single use plastics or take away coffee cups.
  • Ensure year on year reduction of paper and printing to become a paperless office.
  • Ensure a two-bin system for Recycling and Landfill is provided Vincent wide for street waste.
  • Create partnerships with similar sized Local Government areas and NGO’s like Transition Town Vincent to share knowledge on waste reduction and recycling strategies.
  • Promote our local independent businesses that provide products that last longer than those bought at discount department stores and often end up in landfill within a year of purchase – this was part of the philosophy of our toy shop Henry Hiccups.
  • in commercial operations?
  • Review the changes to commercial waste collection recently undertaken.
  • Incentivise the building industry through the building approvals and planning process to use better methods and more materials in the construction of new development, for example:
  • All timber products either being reused, recycled or forest stewardship certified.
  • Steel will be sourced by a responsible steel maker being accredited by the ESC.
  • Concrete mixes to target a 30% reduction of Portland cement.
  • All paints, adhesives, sealants, carpets and engineered wood used as interior finishes have low levels of Volatile Organic Compounds and Formaldehyde content in line with the requirements of Green Star Design. (One Planet Living)
  • at the residential level?
  • Continue to provide incentives for residents to encourage organic food and organic green waste management at home.
  • Review how apartment developments  are generating waste and how this relates to expectations during the approval process.  From there, identify opportunities to reduce waste generation by ensuring better performance and expectations mandated through the planning approval process.
  • Ensure provision of e-waste bins and bins for soft plastics are provided for in our town centres and in larger developments.
  • Educate, educate, educate, the need for this cannot be underestimated.


Q2.
Places that are less car-dominated than the City of Vincent currently is enjoy a range of benefits including:

  • Safer streets
  • Cleaner air
  • Less traffic congestion
  • Healthier, more active population, and
  • Greater independence for children, seniors and people with disabilities.

Are you supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport (eg walking, cycling) in the City of Vincent? If so, what specific measures will you take to enable people to walk, bike (and scoot and skate) more?
If you are not supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport, tell us why.

Yes I’m supportive of initiatives that reduce motor vehicle use and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, this includes:

  • Incentives for the City of Vincent staff (prizes and pay bonuses) to walk or ride to work and report this back to influence other big employers in the City of Vincent.
  • Encourage a diversification of land uses in our Village Centres (offices, retail and restaurants) to ensure workplaces near housing to allow people easy access to employment generators.
  • Have more secure bike parking, theft is a continuing problem.
  • Look at storage and parking for the range of electric vehicles currently being used.
  • A policy framework that is agile and flexible to deal with new ways of active transport and a rapidly changing world.

Q3. Are you supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in the City of Vincent? If so, what tangible ways will you work to increase the urban forest:

Yes this is a key objective if I am elected.

  • on public land?

On my street we have a number of street trees that are exotic species and have died, or don’t provide the shade we need in WA. They just don’t work. I look forward to working with the administration to ensure the long-term longevity of any new plantings on public land.

  • on private land?

I support recent policy changes to ensure 30% tree canopy from new developments but I would like to ensure we retain all trees on private land greater than 3 metres  in height, and/ or ensure there are offsets for development in more inner city areas where there may be not the same opportunities to provide for the areas for deep soil zones.

If you are not supportive of increasing urban greenery, tell us why.

Q4. What are your top priorities if elected to the City of Vincent council?

My priorities if elected are as follows:

  • Be a positive voice that responds to our changing world, prioritising good quality and sensible design to ensure our streets and public spaces are activated and safe.
  • Be an advocate for green space, protecting our tree canopy and sustainability.
  • Promote economic activation to help our Town Centres and local businesses thrive.
  • Be approachable, transparent and a good listener to understand the needs of our diverse community.

Joanne Fotakis

Joanne Fotakis

Q1. What do you see as the main challenges to managing and reducing waste in the City of Vincent and what specific actions will you take to improve the City’s waste management outcomes:

  • in council operations?
  • in commercial operations?
  • at the residential level?

Our Vincent community recognises that waste has significant impacts on the environment and has high expectations when it comes to the City's management of waste. If the City is to create change it must lead by example, and an important part of Vincent's Waste Strategy (2018 – 2023) has been improving the City’s own waste management practises in addition to decreasing waste to landfill, improving recovery, whilst decreasing waste generation within the City as a whole. The Strategy sets an ambitious target of zero waste to landfill by 2028 with some notable actions introduced including application of the Waste Hierarchy in all projects and decision making, early introduction of FOGO to reduce landfill, trial of an on-demand kerb collection service, a review and subsequent ceasing of the City's commercial waste service which was shown to be inefficient, and not providing the level of service needed to encourage businesses to recycle or divert waste from landfill, and inclusion in planning approvals requiring the developer to recycle materials in addition to providing ESD plans I am fully supportive of community-led initiatives such as Repair Cafe, our Composting Station, the Tools n Things tool library in addition to community education programs and the City continuing to provide services such as subsidised home composting and worm farms. A big challenge, and I can speak from experience, remains multi-unit residential buildings. I don't have any answers here, aside from continuing our efforts in community education and support, so I genuinely look forward to hearing any suggestions TTV members might have.

Q2. Places that are less car-dominated than the City of Vincent currently is enjoy a range of benefits including:

  • Safer streets
  • Cleaner air
  • Less traffic congestion
  • Healthier, more active population, and
  • Greater independence for children, seniors and people with disabilities.

Are you supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport (eg walking, cycling) in the City of Vincent? If so, what specific measures will you take to enable people to walk, bike (and scoot and skate) more?
If you are not supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport, tell us why.

I believe the City of Vincent can be a City where people of all ages and abilities can get around safely and easily, and can enjoy our beautiful tree-lined streets and neighbourhoods. I proudly supported the endorsement of Vincent's Accessible City Strategy 2020-2030 which includes strategies to make Vincent safer and more accessible for pedestrians, improve our walking and cycling routes, reduce speed limits on residential streets to 40km/hour by 2023 (currently being trialled), stop rat running, and improve our public transport connections, especially East-West. This document importantly is not a stand alone document with actions integrated into other strategic documents and plans such as our Town Centre Place Plans and Public Health Plan. For an inner city suburb a relatively high percentage of residents get to work by car (about 67%),only 18% catch public transport and 15% walk, cycle or use another form of active transport. There is much to be done to reduce car dependency and increase our use of public transport, walking,cycling and other active transport modes. I have been an active supporter of the City's Safe Active Streets and Play Streets projects and during my time as Chair of Activations for Leederville Connect helped organise the Leedy Streets Open initiative. Of note is Councils commitment to net zero emissions by 2030 which includes a transition of the City fleet to electric cars and bikes.

Q3. Are you supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in the City of Vincent? If so, what tangible ways will you work to increase the urban forest:

  • on public land?
  • on private land?

If you are not supportive of increasing urban greenery, tell us why.

Yes I am most definitely supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in Vincent. Over the past 4 years I have supported a large investment in native tree planting projects in our public parks and greening our street verges. I proudly supported the City's Greening Plan endorsed in 2018, which comes under the umbrella of the City’s Sustainable Environment Strategy.
We can always do more,including creating green links for biodiversity and to support native animals and insects safe migration, and pursuing innovative solutions such as resuming roads for the creation of pocket parks as we did with the Hyde Street Reserve extension and projects successfully implemented by other Councils, or the conversion the Lawler Street sump to a Park. I see underground power essential if we are to meet our canopy targets and support the City actively pursuing more equitable and affordable options – overhead power lines not only limit tree planting opportunities, but restrict tree size and canopy cover that could be achieved on street verges..
Achieving increased canopy on private land is challenging.- development has been a significant contributor to the loss of vegetation and canopy cover not only in Vincent but across Perth. I believe our urban forest is a continuous and essential resource that needs to be managed collectively, regardless of ownership, and there is much work we can do locally to better inform and build understanding. Another pathway has been to utilise legislative/ planning instruments to incentivise the retention of existing mature trees on development sites. and to mandate high deep soil planting requirements and planting of new trees once development is completed which I have consistently supported during my time on Council as well as my recent work for a leading environment not-for-profit organisation.

Q4. What are your top priorities if elected to the City of Vincent council?

If elected I will continue to:
- be a strong voice for greening and sustainability;
- champion the incredible work of our sports clubs and community groups, our independent small businesses, artists and creatives; and
- drive continuing reforms in accountability, and how the Council engages with our community and responds to issues.
Key priorities I will continue to drive include:

✅ 𝗚𝗿𝗲𝗲𝗻𝗲𝗿 𝗻𝗲𝗶𝗴𝗵𝗯𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗱𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝗽𝗲𝗻 𝘀𝗽𝗮𝗰𝗲
- Expanding our native tree planting programs including creating green links for biodiversity;
- Innovative greening projects to increase our parks and green open space;
- Ensuring our parks are safe, inviting and accessible for everyone; and
- Progressing underground power.which is critical if we are to meet our tree canopy targets;

✅ 𝗖𝗹𝗶𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗮 𝘀𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗳𝘂𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲
- Delivering the City's commitment to zero nett emissions by 2030;
- Investing in solar power;
- Reducing waste to landfill through projects like the FOGO (Food and Organics) three-bin system; and
- Continuing to support community-led sustainability initiatives, which we have so many in Vincent to be immensely proud of. Many of these initiated and managed by TTV such as the Community Composting Station, Movie Nights, Repair Cafe Perth, Vincent Soup Kitchen, and Tools n Things Library just to name a few - I await with excitement the next TTV project!

✅ 𝗦𝗮𝗳𝗲𝗿, 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗻𝗲𝗶𝗴𝗵𝗯𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗱𝘀
- Improved lighting of our streets and public parks;
- Increased ranger presence and eyes on the street;
- Reducing speed limits on residential streets to 40km/hour, addressing rat-running and traffic issues through a precinct-based approach;
- Ensuring our streets and public spaces are safe and accessible for pedestrians and people of all ages.

✅ 𝗦𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗻𝗴, 𝗲𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗲𝗻𝗴𝗮𝗴𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 - Ensure consultation with our community is inclusive, genuine and meaningful, and central to decision making, especially in planning and development matters, that responses are provided in a timely manner, expand the use of community panels, and increase community participation in the budget process.

✅ 𝗩𝗶𝗯𝗿𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝘁𝗼𝘄𝗻 𝗰𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗲𝘀 - Continue reforms to reduce red tape, and support local small businesses. Support our Town Teams and community groups, to deliver activities and events that bring people together, and our Town Centres to be vibrant, accessible and people friendly.

✅ 𝗦𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗹𝗼𝗰𝗮𝗹 𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘀 𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 - Investing in public art and local Arts and Creative Hubs, supporting local artists and creative industries to provide relief and rebound from COVID-19.

Johnathan Hallet

Johnathan Hallett

Q1. What do you see as the main challenges to managing and reducing waste in the City of Vincent and what specific actions will you take to improve the City’s waste management outcomes:

  • in council operations?
  • in commercial operations?
  • at the residential level?

One of my first motions on council was for the City of Vincent to review its internal processes to reduce and where possible eliminate single-use plastics at all levels of the organisation. Single-use plastic products dominate the lists of litter items collected in marine and other environments posing a huge threat to wildlife. We can't rely on recycling to reduce this impact - we must stop using these plastics in the first place. This was supported unanimously by council and has had flow on effects to procurement and events held in the City. In 2018 Council declared a climate emergency and included emissions reduction as part of our Waste Management Strategy, and we have set a target of zero waste to landfill by 2028. We’re currently rolling out FOGO early to reduce organic waste going to landfill and the waste hierarchy informs decision-making across the organisation. We’re also trialling on-demand kerb collection for better waste management and diversion as well as transitioning commercial waste services to bespoke contracts that better fit the waste needs of commercial entities to increase recycling and diversion. In the space of building development, we are looking at the requirement for use of recycled materials along with other environmental standards we’ve already put in place for developers. This is a space with many opportunities for us and I’m keen for us to drive action in this area both within Vincent as well as through our support of community initiatives like TTV’s Community Composting and more broadly changing the way our community sees resources and private ownership. Repair Café, Tools n Things and Buy Nothing Groups are important and practical ways that we can drive behaviour change. We also need to maintain our advocacy at state and federal levels – we need national recycling targets and mandated reductions in packaging to move towards a truly circular economy.

Q2. Places that are less car-dominated than the City of Vincent currently is enjoy a range of benefits including:

  • Safer streets
  • Cleaner air
  • Less traffic congestion
  • Healthier, more active population, and
  • Greater independence for children, seniors and people with disabilities.

Are you supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport (eg walking, cycling) in the City of Vincent? If so, what specific measures will you take to enable people to walk, bike (and scoot and skate) more?

If you are not supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport, tell us why.

Our City of Vincent Accessible City Strategy was recently approved by Council and formally established a hierarchy of people, followed by cyclists and cars at the bottom. As a councillor I regularly get feedback that speeds feel unsafe even if the traffic data ends up showing that people aren't generally speeding above the allowable 50km/hr. Cities around the world are moving to lower speeds like 40 or 30 to prioritise pedestrian and cyclist safety. I believe we must move more people out of cars and out of driving through local streets. Further rollout of our bicycle network, moving to 40km in our local streets and finding new ways to divert traffic out of local streets will help us reclaim streets as active living spaces and not just corridors for transit. We need to ensure our streets are greener, shadier and safer for walking. Active transport is a key part of our new Public Health Plan. One of our challenges is the lack of East-West public transit in the City and this remains on our advocacy agenda. Expanding the Hyde Street reserve showed what streets could be and we need more streets regenerated into green community spaces.

Q3. Are you supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in the City of Vincent? If so, what tangible ways will you work to increase the urban forest:

  • on public land?
  • on private land?

If you are not supportive of increasing urban greenery, tell us why.

Absolutely. Tree canopy and broader greening in the City is essential for promoting biodiversity, enhancing our mental and physical health, to combat the urban heat island effect, as carbon stores and increase the amenity of our streets to bring people out and connect with each other. We have a Greening Plan for the City that we reviewed in 2018 and one of the key opportunities we looked at was the need to separately address canopy loss on private land and the need for further education on the importance of trees in the community. We’ve got ambitious targets for tree canopy that we’ve been on track to exceed and so we’ve pushed ourselves further this year by increasing them. We’ve been rolling out eco-zoning and tree planting initiatives across our public open spaces and verges, and as a council have consistently supported maintaining a significant budget for this. A big challenge we are currently grappling with is how to underground our power so that the good work we do on street verges can be maximised. Private land is more difficult – in many ways Vincent has been a leader in our requirement for deep soil and landscaping on new developments, but this is insufficient to address the loss caused by increasing density. This is an area in which we are still working to find new ways to incentivise tree conservation and additional planting.

Q4. What are your top priorities if elected to the City of Vincent council?

As a Councillor I’m committed to being responsive, transparent and accountable, and ensuring community is at the centre of decision-making. My priorities for the next four years are:

  • Driving down the cost of energy for the council and our ratepayers by harnessing local government’s ability to bulk-buy solar panels for Vincent businesses and buildings.
  • Enhancing local decision-making through support for our town teams, precinct and community groups, more meaningful consultation in planning processes and responsive customer service.
  • Finding better ways to address rat running, congestion and community safety through precinct wide planning and enhancing connectivity across pedestrian, cycling and traffic networks.
  • Promoting urban greening to cool our neighbourhoods, improve walkability and enhance local biodiversity; expanding access to local community gardens and establishing edible verges.

Suzanne Worner

Suzanne Worner

DISCLAIMER: Suzane Worner is a Transition Town Vincent volunteer however she was not involved in any relevant discussions related to this survey.

Q1. What do you see as the main challenges to managing and reducing waste in the City of Vincent and what specific actions will you take to improve the City’s waste management outcomes:

  • in council operations?
  • in commercial operations?
  • at the residential level?

On the subject of waste, I do note that the City of Vincent have been quite proactive in their waste strategy with targets of zero waste sent to landfill by 2028 and the implementation of a ‘Waste Hierarchy’.

I also note the forthcoming roll-out of the FOGO system, initiatives supported by the Council such as the Repair Café, ‘Buy Nothing’ online groups and other community-level sustainability movements.

As a Councillor I would advocate that the City continues to build on these initiatives and would assist with finding more ways to achieve this.

In my professional capacity as co-director of UpBeat Events, the waste strategy plan for each event we manage is critical and a major part of our plans. In producing a large-scale event, such as the Mount Hawthorn Streets and Lanes Festival and Light Up Leederville, ‘zero waste’ can be (and is) achieved through attentive management, education and - sometimes - literally jumping into the bins and sorting the rubbish! We employ a resource recovery expert who specialises in design, delivery and education for each of our events.

From a personal perspective I sometimes find the simple act of actually of putting something in a bin quite overwhelming. You want to do the right thing – but which bin? I believe my own ideals as a candidate align with those of Transition Town Vincent: helping people to make small steps. In this case, clearly defining which bin to use and why. An important part of behaviour change is empowering people to make their own choices. Small steps can lead to great changes.

Q2. Places that are less car-dominated than the City of Vincent currently is enjoy a range of benefits including:

  • Safer streets
  • Cleaner air
  • Less traffic congestion
  • Healthier, more active population, and
  • Greater independence for children, seniors and people with disabilities.

Are you supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport (eg walking, cycling) in the City of Vincent? If so, what specific measures will you take to enable people to walk, bike (and scoot and skate) more?
If you are not supportive of reducing car use and increasing active transport, tell us why.

On the subject of car use, the City of Vincent – due to its location on the fringe of the CBD – is a thoroughfare for commuters and suffers from traffic congestion. Being an ‘older’ part of metropolitan Perth also means much of the road layout was implemented without modern transport planning considerations. These are the realities we need to find ways to best work around.

Transport planning is an ongoing process and the City of Vincent has a vital role in being a conduit for open communication between residents and Main Roads WA. It is the residents who are often best placed to identify issues as they arise, and the council who can provide support through data collection and advocacy. Sometimes a solution for one street becomes a problem on another, so this constant partnership is one that needs to be positively maintained.

The advantage of Vincent’s proximity to the Perth CBD is the accessibility to retail, hospitality and other businesses. I rate ‘what you can walk to’ as defining the quality of a suburb and Vincent’s ‘walkability’ factor is one of the best in Perth. The real key, though, is finding ways to get people to take advantage of it: how do we encourage people to walk or cycle? The answers are, I imagine, quite varied: quality of infrastructure, safety and convenience in poor weather, for example. Similarly, does Vincent do a good enough job of promoting its walkability and bike-friendliness. This is something I look forward to exploring further should I be elected.

Q3. Are you supportive of increasing greenery and tree canopy in the City of Vincent? If so, what tangible ways will you work to increase the urban forest:

  • on public land?
  • on private land?

If you are not supportive of increasing urban greenery, tell us why.

You’ve also asked me about trees and I must say that when I’m out doorknocking it’s obvious that trees are a major issue for residents. The City of Vincent’s efforts in increasing canopy coverage, retaining elements of existing coverage on private land, reducing urban heat effects and encouraging community awareness and involvement is definitely the way to proceed – and lead.

It is equally vital, though, to consider the types of vegetation planted in specific places so as to not create future issues (something I also hear about when I’m out doorknocking) and this can be done with regular consultation with experts in the field.

Currently residents have access to two native plant sales per year in an effort to increase native flora in their gardens and establish a biodiversity corridor. Other programs such as the adopt-a-verge initiative enable residents to be proactive within their own space.

Q4. What are your top priorities if elected to the City of Vincent council?

Looking lastly at my priorities if elected, I have no hesitation in saying that I don’t stand on any one particular platform – I plan to be an advocate for all. My role is to listen and engage on all issues, not just one.

I wish to be a part of the elements that the City of Vincent already does well and to find ways to improve the things it doesn’t. The Council is made up of eight councillors and a Mayor who must all work together in the best interests of the community.

Quite simply, I wish to be a voice for the community.

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